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Tag:Armando Galarraga
Posted on: January 28, 2011 7:14 pm
Edited on: January 30, 2011 8:36 pm
 

Jim Joyce's road from October

It's been a process for umpire Jim Joyce, moving from the mental exhaustion of the 2010 season and the Armando Galarraga Game last June to the point where now he's anticipating this spring training more than any recent camp.

What Kay Joyce most has noticed about her husband of 28 years is that he was very quiet for the first month or so after he returned home last October.

"Very, very quiet," Kay says. "I got him to go to Home Depot once, and four different people came up to him.

"I thought, 'Oh, now I know why.' It's all good, but. ..."

But the guy she noticed following her husband around a grocery store one day, up and down multiple aisles, she wasn't sure that would be good.

Turned out, though, it was simply the store manager.

"He just wanted to shake Jim's hand," she says.

Yes, it's been strange the way a man working in a profession in which the perfect day is to go unnoticed has been, well, regularly noticed.

"It has turned into a phenomenon," Jim Joyce says. "We're not perfect. We're not perfect people. I just happened to be imperfect at the wrong time."

Though he's intent on moving past 2010, two of the items he's kept from last summer are way cool: Baggage tags that were on his luggage when he traveled from Detroit to Philadelphia after the Galarraga game on which unidentified handlers scribbled personal notes.

One one tag was written, "You gave your best. God bless. (signed) DTW baggage"

On the other: "We are all human. Good luck. (signed) DTW."

"That was a shock to me," Joyce says. "So many people have been supportive. I couldn't be more happy that it still is a positive."

Likes: Not surprising, the notes on those baggage tags. As someone who hails from that area -- about 30 minutes north of Joyce's hometown of Toledo, Ohio -- the spirit of the good Midwestern people remains with me to this day. Joyce and I discussed that Friday. "They talk about Southern hospitality," he says. "It's definitely a Midwest thing, too, supporting a Midwesterner." ... Speaking of which, great news that Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Band will tour beginning in March. Rock and roll never forgets, baby. ... Keith Richards' autobiography "Life" is a great read. Loved it. ... Tyler Kepner's New York Times piece on Gil Meche retiring and leaving $12 million on the table the other day. ... If you're looking for a good movie this weekend, check out The King's Speech. Outstanding. Great story, and what acting from Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush.

Dislikes:
Get well soon, Jimmy Buffett. Here's the tale from the doc who tended to him.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"I've got fevered dreams
"Mighty plans
"Need a black top road
"I need a wheel in my hands
"So long Arizona
"So long desert sands
"I need to face the promise
"Of the promised land"

-- Bob Seger, Face the Promise

Posted on: January 5, 2011 9:25 pm
Edited on: January 5, 2011 9:26 pm
 

Love Letters: The post-Christmas edition

In a perfect world, one would not begin the New Year with an apology. But here goes: I've made plenty of jokes in the past about the Rally Monkey. I had never written about New York Gov. David Paterson until zinging him in my Christmas column for improperly accepting Yankees World Series tickets. Problem was, never even thinking about the fact that Paterson is African-American, I trotted out another Rally Monkey joke. Plus, I referred to him "Peterson" instead of "Paterson." A couple of readers rightly jumped on me, and all I can say is, I apologize for the typo in his name, and especially for the unintended tasteless joke. Didn't mean it that way, but that's how it turned out, and, ugh. My bad, and my regrets. On with this week's letters. ...

FROM: Rick B.
Re: Christmas tidings for those naughty and nice around MLB

As an ex-New Yorker, I don't think Gov. Paterson has served the state well. However, the rally monkey to me came across as racist. I don't know what you meant, but it's what and how it was said.

See above. That may be the last Rally Monkey joke for me.

FROM: Eric B.

A. NY Governor is David Paterson, not Peterson. B. James Brown lyric is, "Sometimes I feel so nice, I want to jump back, and kiss myself." You conflated I feel good with the true lyric and jump up instead of back. Don't channel the Godfather unless you can feel it.

I thought I was feeling it. Turns out, maybe I really didn't know what I was feeling that day.

FROM: Andrew S.

Hope your Christmas was a joyous one for you and yours, Scott. Always enjoy reading the musings from one of baseball's tireless columnists! My Christmas wish for the O's: Don't mortgage the farm system, but somehow find a way to make a splash still this offseason if for no other reason than to show the big boys in the AL East the Birdies are coming back to roost.

I could feel the nostalgia and frustration in Orioles owner Peter Angelos' statement Wednesday congratulating former O Robbie Alomar for election to baseball's Hall of Fame.

FROM: Kurt K.

Hi Scott,

First off, a Merry Christmas to you and your family! I normally don't respond to articles, but I wanted to let you know that your "Christmas tidings for those naughty and nice around MLB" article was great! It was very well written and I really like you stressing the importance of class and sportsmanship. Those are some of what is great about the game of baseball. These things seem lost in the other pro sports. Anyway, keep up the good work. Merry Christmas from Switzerland, Kurt.

If it's up to me, the behavior of Detroit's Armando Galarraga and umpire Jim Joyce will be remembered for a long, long time. The way each man handled such an unfortunate situation was the highlight of the 2010 season.

FROM: Rick
Re: If playoffs ain't broke, don't fix 'em with expansion

It is either playoff expansion or a salary cap. I guess Bud Selig sees this as an alternative because he knows the league will never have a salary cap, at least not under him, and it allows small-market teams to make the playoffs.

It's too easy, though, isn't it? And this solution only patches a surface wound. No depth there.

FROM: Terry F.

Baseball has a tight postseason? How do you figure? Baseball teams playing in the World Series have more off days than they have scheduled game days in October. How is that a tight schedule? I would characterize it as a laid-back schedule. Teams play when they get around to it. Personally, I believe that baseball's current post-season is a total disaster.

I was writing in relative terms, Terry. It had been tight up until a couple of years ago, and comparatively speaking, it's far more tight than, say, the NBA. But that was part of the point of the column, too: It needs to be tightened even more, and it needs to REMAIN tight.

FROM: Frank D.

As usual, terrific writing and a very good solution. However ... unlike you, Selig isn't competent, nor logical. He is the worst commissioner in the history of North American sports. This cretin has canceled a season, stood idle while steroids have ravaged the sport's credibility and records and has allowed for unprecedented spending without a real obstruction, tipping the balance in favor of a handful of teams. He has taken the All-Star Game, once a fun event, and turned it into a game where an exhibition determines home-field for the sport's crown jewel. He's a weak, incompetent joke.

Your punches are harder than anything I saw thrown in The Fighter last week.

FROM: Paul

The problem with baseball IS the Yankees & Red Sox. I was once a big-time baseball fan. Seeing other teams compete every year made the game fun and varied, but over the last 15 years, seeing the Yanks & Sox every post season truly made the game boring. Is their rivalry and press coverage any different than say, Brangelina? Or Kate Gosselin? Lindsey Lohan? Over-saturation kills everything.

Baseball seems to think that shoving those two teams down our throat is good for the game. It's not. I'm a football fan first now, primarily because in any given year, with some good draft choices, a team can compete for a playoff spot and be contenders for a long time. Sadly, no matter how well the Indians, Padres, Royals or Pirates draft, their window to compete is short and their rebuild to contender status long. Baseball = boredom these days. Give me the NFL.

I think the next poll we do should be asking how many folks think the Yankees and Red Sox need to check themselves into rehab, prefarably in an adjoining room to Lohan.

FROM:
Christopher from Toronto

Scott,

Love the piece and I think you're bang on. Leave things the way they are. If one game could tell us something, the season would be 82 games.

I'll have you know that I think "bang on" is a very underrated term that I wish were used far more often. "Wanker", too.

FROM: Nathan P.

Scott,

Money will ruin the baseball regular season one day. How do you think guys get paid $150 million contracts over five years? It's all about advertising. The NBA ruined its regular season; the season should be shortened to 40 games. The NFL will expand to 18 games, which is way too long. Just accept it. It's too bad that's the way it is: a pennant used to mean something. Now most people don't know what a pennant is.

I think I had one hanging on my bedroom wall once upon a time. ...

FROM: CHISOX1958

I am a huge fan of baseball. But, as far as expanding the playoffs go, let's get real. This isn't hockey or basketball, where every lame team gets in.

Or, perhaps, the NFL, where the Seahawks not only qualify, but host a playoff game with a 7-9 record? Interesting how there is very little outrage about that.

FROM: Frank L.
Re.: Cleveland loses a true, rare legend in Feller
http://www.cbssports.com/mlb/story/
14447735/cleveland-loses-a-true-rar
e-legend-in-feller

Your article was right on after the initial sentence -- but the opening was insulting. To mention a hero in the truest sense of the word [Bob Feller] with a draft dodger [John Wayne] is very distasteful. Marion Morrison had no place in that article. You have really ruined my day and possibly many other vets of WWII.

(Signed)
A Feller fan since 1937

Say what you want about Marion Morrison. But where Wayne is concerned, I was simply comparing Feller to some of the same values people in general associate with the characters Wayne played. That part of it holds up.

FROM: Jerry K.

As a lifelong Indians fan whose first game in 1946 at age 8 was pitched by Bob Feller, I say you summed it up perfectly. Especially as to CC Sabathia and Cliff Lee, who are not bad guys but are corrupted by the owners' greed.

Alex, I'll take "Corruption for $100 million plus, please". ...

Posted on: June 3, 2010 8:26 pm
 

A few final thoughts on the travesty in Detroit

Let's start with this: If you have not heard umpire Jim Joyce's agony in the aftermath of his blown call to rob Detroit's Armando Galarraga of a perfect game Wednesday night, you owe it to yourself to listen. Especially if you're hopping mad, looking for somebody to slug and your blood pressure is through the roof:

Listen to Jim Joyce here.

And if some of your hardness doesn't begin to melt just a little after listening, then I imagine you've never made a mistake in your life. It's darn tough not to feel for the man.

Meantime, with the wreckage still smoldering in Detroit, the important thing now is to figure out what lessons can be learned.

Me, I see several (besides baseball needing to look seriously at implementing more replay and better umpires).

I see Galarraga offering an incredible example of class and sportsmanship. "Nobody's perfect," he said Wednesday night. Imagine! This from a 28-year-old man immediately after he <em>was</em> perfect. From a man who is fighting for a permanent spot on Detroit's roster -- he was recently recalled from Triple-A Toledo.

I see Joyce, heartsick and temporarily broken, offering a gut-wrenching apology and exemplifying courage at its finest. Awful day at the office, yes. We all have those. But not all of us are strong enough to shoulder a colossal mistake. Not only did he seek Galarraga out to apologize after he viewed the replay on Wednesday night, he worked the plate for Thursday's series finale, shrugging off baseball's offer to take a sabbatical. And Cleveland manager Manny Acta afterward said Joyce had a great game.

I see class from the Tigers and manager Jim Leyland, who said before the game, "This is not a day to boo a bad call. This is a day to cheer integrity." And: "This is a day for Detroit to shine."

I saw Detroit shine when some of the 28,169 fans in Comerica Park applauded the umpires when they took the field, causing Joyce, a jangle of raw emotions, to cry.

It's terrible the way this all went down. But I'll tell you this: If not for the class of Galarraga, Joyce, Leyland and others, this could have been a whole lot uglier. In a bad situation, they all took the high road and, maybe, made us all think a little bit and re-examine a little bit of ourselves.

For that, baseball owes all of them a debt of gratitude.

Likes: June and San Diego, Texas, Cincinnati and Atlanta are in first place with Oakland lurking nearby. Can never get enough Cinderella stories. ... The Braves are making Bobby Cox proud. ... Glad to hear Ken Griffey Jr. is going to be working for the Mariners sometime soon. The only thing worse than when a superstar's career ends is when he disappears completely. Good for the game when they stay around and remain visible. ... Radical changes to Friday Night Lights as the fourth season is underway (for those of us who don't have DirecTV), and the show continues to crackle with great writing and superb acting.

Dislikes: Too bad Ken Griffey Jr.'s retirement was overshadowed by the non-perfect game fallout. I mean, the Commissioner's Office wound up releasing a statement on the Detroit brouhaha Thursday before it issued a statement congratulating Griffey for a great career. ... Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm and Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow lobbying Thursday for baseball to reverse umpire Jim Joyce's blown call and award Armando Galarraga the perfect game he lost. How about you two politicians concentrate on Michigan's future and lowering that unemployment rate?

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"Yesterday's over my shoulder
"So I can't look back for too long
"There's just too much to see waiting in front of me
"And I know that I just can't go wrong"

-- Jimmy Buffett, Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes

 

Posted on: June 3, 2010 2:59 pm
Edited on: June 3, 2010 3:33 pm
 

Selig does not overturn Joyce's call

Baseball is not inclined to reverse umpire Jim Joyce's call and retroactively award Detroit pitcher Armando Galarraga a perfect game. At least, not today. And not in the future, according to a baseball official who is not authorized to speak on the record.

What baseball is inclined to do, according to Commissioner Bud Selig, is this:

"Given last night's call and other recent events, I will examine our umpiring system, the expanded use of instant replay and all other related features. Before I announce any decisions, I will consult with all appropriate parties, including our two unions and the Special Committee for On-Field Matters, which consists of field managers, general managers, club owners and presidents.”

So to (instantly) review:

Consult and deliberate, yes.

To order history changed, no.

Selig, in a statement, also congratulated Galarraga on "a remarkable pitching performance", adding that "all of us who love the game appreciate the historic nature of his effort last night."

He also acknowledged the "dignity and class of the entire Detroit Tigers organization", noting that the Tigers "were truly admirable and embodied good sportsmanship of the highest order."

And finally, he said: "As Jim Joyce said in his postgame comments, there is no dispute that last night's game should have ended differently.  While the human element has always been an integral part of baseball, it is vital that mistakes on the field be addressed."

 

 
 
 
 
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