Tag:Miguel Tejada
Posted on: November 30, 2010 9:50 pm
 

Shortstops on the move, Rays' Bartlett next?

Shortstops fell quickly from the board Tuesday, which likely will lead to more urgency in Tampa Bay's trade talks surrounding Jason Bartlett over the next few days.

Juan Uribe signed with the Dodgers, Miguel Tejada agreed to terms with the Giants and the Cardinals acquired Ryan Theriot from the Dodgers for reliever Blake Hawksworth.

Meanwhile, even after striking a deal with Tejada, the Giants, according to sources, are one of several clubs engaging the Rays in conversations regarding Bartlett.

With Reid Brignac ready to play shortstop every day for the Rays and Tampa about to be decimated by the free agent market, general manager Andrew Friedman is investigating multiple scenarios. While All-Star outfielder Carl Crawford is expected to leave, the Rays also expect gaping holes in their bullpen.

Already this winter, set-up man Joaquin Benoit has signed with Detroit. Closer Rafael Soriano is expected to leave (for the Angels, perhaps?) and Grant Balfour, Randy Choate and Chad Qualls each declined arbitration on Tuesday.

Consequently, the Rays are said by rivals to be casting a wide net for relief help.

Aside from the Giants, the Orioles and Padres have expressed interest, according to sources. The Cardinals kicked the tires as well before nabbing Theriot for Hawksworth, who would have fit one of the areas the Rays are attempting to re-load.

San Diego could offer closer Heath Bell, who is eligible for free agency after 2011 and is expected to be moved sometime between now and the July trade deadline. Having lost Tejada to the Giants on Tuesday and having declined to offer arbitration to David Eckstein, the Padres are down to Everth Cabrera, Jerry Hairston Jr. and rookie Matt Antonelli as serviceable middle infielders.

Bartlett is eligible for arbitration for the third consecutive season before he can become a free agent after the 2011 season.

 

Posted on: November 30, 2010 9:23 pm
 

Giants agree to terms with Miguel Tejada

Moving quickly to plug the hole in their infield, World Series champion San Francisco agreed to terms with shortstop Miguel Tejada on a one-year, $6.5 million deal Tuesday just hours after postseason hero Juan Uribe officially signed with the Dodgers.

Tejada's deal with the Giants, confirmed to CBSSports.com by a high-ranking baseball official, will not be formalized until after he passes a physical. Because the Padres did not offer Tejada arbitration, they will not receive a compensatory draft pick from the Giants. The deal was first reported by Enrique Rojas of ESPNDeportes.

Part of what made Tejada attractive to the Giants, aside from the fact that he generally misses only a game or two a season, is that he can play both shortstop and third base. With serious questions surrounding Pablo Sandoval's ability to lose weight, the Giants could line up next year with Sandoval at third and Tejada at short ... or with Tejada at third and someone else at shortstop.

That someone else could be Tampa Bay's Jason Bartlett. Trade talks between the Giants and Rays are continuing even after the Giants reached an agreement with Tejada, according to multiple sources. One source described talks between the Giants and Rays as "fluid."

Tejada, 36, started last season at third base in Baltimore, then returned to his old position, shortstop, when the Padres acquired him in a trade just before the July 31 deadline. Overall in 2010, Tejada hit .269 with a .312 on-base percentage and a .381 slugging percentage with 15 homers and 71 RBI.

In 59 stretch-run games with San Diego, he batted .268 with eight homers and 32 RBI.

If Sandoval follows the workout regimen prescribed for him this winter and loses 15-to-20 pounds, he and Tejada likely will make up the left side of the San Francisco infield.

But a trade could change that, as could the presence of Mark DeRosa, who missed almost all of 2010 with a wrist injury. DeRosa can play multiple infield positions, including third base, and outfield. He could spell Sandoval at third.

Either way, Tejada currently is lined up to play short -- unless general manager Brian Sabean acquires a true shortstop over the next several weeks.

Posted on: September 14, 2010 1:28 am
 

Tejada wins battle, Padres win the war

DENVER – Losers of 13 of their past 17 games and having watched a large first-place lead melt to nothing, the Padres to a man were on the top step of their dugout, hanging on the railing, when Miguel Tejada stepped up in the first inning with one out and one on.

The white-hot Rockies had won 10 in a row in what has evolved into a riveting NL West race.

With Tejada at the plate, the Padres' case of suspended animation was about to continue.

He battled Colorado starter Jeff Francis for nine pitches before ripping a two-run homer well over the left-field wall to kick-start San Diego's 6-4 win and break Colorado's 10-game winning streak.

For a badly slumping team that had scored only 38 runs over its past 17 games, Tejada produced exactly what was needed.

"He fought," manager Bud Black said. "Francis threw him everything. Miggy had some reactionary swings to some pitches, and he fought some balls off."

Tejada was behind in the count 0-1 and 1-2 before fouling off one pitch, taking a ball, fouling off another pitch, taking ball three and then fouling off two more. Then, bam. He crushed a full-count, 89 m.p.h. fastball.

"That was a great at-bat," Black said. "Those at-bats in a game, over the course of the game and after, you look back and say, 'That was a hell of an at-bat.'"

It was a veritable offensive boon for the Padres. Tejada wound up with four RBIs, and San Diego's Nos. 2-5 hitters -- Aaron Cunningham, Tejada, Adrian Gonzalez and Ryan Ludwick -- went 9-for-15.

The Padres led 5-0 but, as is typical in Coors Field, the Rockies charged back to within 5-4 -- Troy Tulowitzski's three-run homer in the fifth aided that -- before San Diego's six-man relief effort over 4 1/3 innings halted them.

"You talk about this park, a four- or five-run lead is really a one- or two-run lead," Black said. "You never really know how a game is going to play out here. You really don't."

Likes: Great drama in the ninth when, with the Padres ahead 6-4, closer Heath Bell walked leadoff man Seth Smith to ensure he would have to face smoking hot Carlos Gonzalez. Sure enough, CarGo, leading the NL in batting average, stepped to the plate with two out and one on. Bell induced a bouncer to shortstop. "Tonight, I broke his bat and I won," Bell said. "Hopefully, I don't have to face him tomorrow." ... Great game in Tampa, er, St. Petersburg on Monday. Tampa Bay moves into first place in the AL East with the 1-0 win. David Price and CC Sabathia lived up to the billing, one day after Tim Lincecum-Mat Latos didn't (well, Latos didn't) in the Giants-Padres battle in San Diego. ... Fontano's Chicago Subs in Denver. Had never been there before until lunch Monday, but will be back. ... Monroe (Mich.) St. Mary Catholic Central drilling Riverview on the high school football field Friday night. Excellent win in moving to 2-1. Next victim for the Falcons: Flat Rock.

Dislikes: Hate to see Florida shut down ace Josh Johnson with back issues, but it's the smart thing to do. So many people don't realize how good that guy is. ... The Video Music Awards the other night. Watched the first 30 minutes, and I never realized what a classless pig Chelsea Handler is. I've seen her books, but wow, her act was tiresome quick.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"Born into Nixon I was raised in hell
"A welfare child where the teamsters dwelled
"The last one born, and the first one to run
"My town was blind from refinery sun
"My generation is zero
"I never made it as a working class hero
"21st century breakdown
"I once was lost but never was found
"I think I am losing what's left of my mind
"To the 20th century deadline"

-- Green Day, 21st Century Breakdown

Posted on: July 29, 2010 5:52 pm
Edited on: July 29, 2010 6:40 pm
 

Padres acquire Miguel Tejada from Baltimore

The streaking San Diego Padres, with the National League's best record, have acquired Baltimore infielder Miguel Tejada in rookie general manager Jed Hoyer's first big July trade deadline deal.

The Padres, who sent Double-A right-hander Wynn Pelzer to the Orioles, hope Tejada will help strengthen both their offense and their middle infield. He is expected to play shortstop upon joining the club as long as David Eckstein (calf) is on the disabled list and Jerry Hairston Jr. is playing second base.

Tejada, 36, is owed a little more than $2 million for the remainder of 2010. The Orioles will send an undisclosed amount of cash to the Padres to help cover that.

The 2002 American League Most Valuable Player was hitting .269 with seven home runs and 39 RBI in 97 games for the Orioles this season. Though he was playing third base for the Orioles, the Padres view him as more of a utilityman who will play some short, some third and even some outfield. Basically, a player who will give manager Bud Black more options.

Eckstein went onto the disabled list with a right calf strain July 21, and Black indicated Wednesday that he may not be quite ready to return when he is eligible on Aug. 5.

"The degree of the strain shouldn't keep him out for a prolonged period of time," Black said. "We're going to make sure David goes through all of the right steps to come back."

Eckstein is hitting .279 with a .326 on-base percentage and is statistically the most difficult regular to strike out in the National League.

Jerry Hairston Jr., who had been getting starts at shortstop, has been playing second base in Eckstein's absence. But that means Cabrera, who is hitting just .201 with a .270 on-base percentage, is getting more regular time at short and is not faring well under the daily grind.

Because of that, the Padres shifted their priorities from acquiring a starting pitcher and/or an outfielder to middle infield.

"Jed's trying like heck," one source said of general manager Hoyer's efforts during his first July trade deadline as the man in charge.

The Padres, who continue to own the best record in the NL, rank only 14th in the league with a .252 batting average and 14th with a .377 slugging percentage. However, they are hitting .276 with runners in scoring position.

Posted on: July 29, 2010 12:58 pm
 

Padres talking Tejada with Orioles

With sparkplug second baseman David Eckstein disabled and young shortstop Everth Cabrera looking lost, the first-place San Diego Padres have sharpened their focus to acquiring a middle infielder before the July 31 trade deadline.

Their chief target appears to be Baltimore's veteran Miguel Tejada, a player they think could both help their offense and relieve some of the current stress on the infield. But the Orioles are fielding inquiries from other clubs on Tejada as well -- among others, they've talked with Philadelphia and St. Louis -- and the Padres might not have the goods to complete the deal.

Eckstein went onto the disabled list with a right calf strain July 21, and Padres manager Bud Black indicated Wednesday that he may not be quite ready to return when he is eligible on Aug. 5.

"The degree of the strain shouldn't keep him out for a prolonged period of time," Black said. "We're going to make sure David goes through all of the right steps to come back."

Eckstein is hitting .279 with a .326 on-base percentage and is statistically the most difficult regular to strike out in the National League.

Jerry Hairston Jr., who had been getting starts at shortstop, has been playing second base in Eckstein's absence. But that means Cabrera, who is hitting just .201 with a .270 on-base percentage, is getting more regular time at short and is not faring well under the daily grind.

Because of that, the Padres have shifted their priorities from acquiring a starting pitcher and/or an outfielder to middle infield.

"Jed's trying like heck," one source said of general manager Jed Hoyer's efforts during his first July trade deadline as the man in charge.

The Padres, who continue to own the best record in the NL, rank only 14th in the league with a .252 batting average and 14th with a .377 slugging percentage. However, they are hitting .276 with runners in scoring position.

Tejada, 36, is hitting .269 with seven home runs and 39 RBI in 97 games for the Orioles this season. Though he's playing third base, the Padres think he could return to his shortstop roots for some games here and there -- particularly until Eckstein returns and Hairston Jr. is freed up to return to short. The Padres also think he could play some outfield.

Tejada is owed roughly $2 million for the rest of 2010 and, if the Orioles do move him, probably will cost the acquiring team a mid-level prospect.

Posted on: May 21, 2010 11:08 pm
Edited on: May 22, 2010 12:34 am
 

Astros' Oswalt wants to blast off -- elsewhere

Each man has his own breaking point, and Astros ace Roy Oswalt has reached his.

Saddled with the worst run support in the National League, a frustrated Oswalt essentially told the Astros to take his no-trade clause and shove it.

So much for the Craig Biggio-Jeff Bagwell Be An Astro For Life program.

In theory, at least.

There are two important things to understand here:

1. Just because Oswalt has requested a trade doesn't mean he'll get one.

2. Whatever happens, owner Drayton McLane, working on running his own organization into the ground, likely will screw it up.

How can I be so sure about that last point?

The Astros, in the process of going toes up in 2006 following their surprise World Series appearance in '05, were close to trading Oswalt to Baltimore at the '06 July deadline in a deal that would have brought them what they really needed at the time: A bat.

Specifically, Miguel Tejada's bat.

This was back when Tejada was still playing 162 games a season, slugging 25 homers and knocking in 100 or more runs.

But McLane, with a personal affinity for Oswalt, frustrated the Orioles by pulling Oswalt off the table. The Astros wound up finishing second in the NL Central that summer (82-80) and have not finished higher than third in the division since.

That's just one example of McLane's mostly tone-deaf stewardship of the Astros, a run that's led to the bottoming-out of the club in 2010. I mean, really. Cecil Cooper as manager? Practically within minutes of Commissioner Bud Selig publicly suggesting it?

They've got the worst record in the NL. And their offense going into the weekend ranked last in, among other things, batting average, on-base percentage, slugging percentage, runs scored, hits, home runs, doubles and total bases.

Against that backdrop, it's easy to see why Oswalt, 32, is throwing up his hands.

Problem is, in no small part because McLane allowed his emotions sway decisions, the Astros waited too long to deal Oswalt.

To get that big package of prospects in return that McLane no doubt will require now, the Astros should have dealt him well before he turned 32 ... or before they signed him to the monstrous five-year, $73 million deal they awarded him.

Which McLane bestowed upon him roughly a month after Oswalt's feelings were bruised at the '06 deadline when word leaked that the Astros had included him in trade discussions.

Fact is, even though Oswalt has started the season with nine consecutive quality starts (he's 2-6 with a 2.66 ERA), he's no longer a $15 million pitcher (his 2010 salary). And next year, he's not going to be a $16 million pitcher.

All told, if a team takes on Oswalt, they'll be responsible for roughly $25 million through 2011 (including a $2 million buyout clause for 2012). Unless you've got deep pockets (hello, Mets), that's far too much dinero for many clubs that can really use starting pitching now.

Texas? Forget it. Creditors are nipping at the franchise's heels.

The Dodgers? Forget it. The McCourts are preparing to tee it up in Divorce Court later this summer.

The Cubs? Memo to Drayton: Kid shortstop Starlin Castro isn't going anywhere.

Oswalt is not going to win that World Series ring in Houston, but at least he has that bulldozer McLane gave him as a reward for that memorable '05 postseason run.

Oh, and one other thing: Houston, by the way, did end up acquiring Tejada a little more than a year later, in December, 2007.

Which means they acquired him too late ... and now they face trying to trade Oswalt at the wrong time as well.

It's a game of timing, friends. And the Astros' is miserable.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com